Bahamas Caving Adventures

Eleuthera Cave Fauna

Harbour Island Beach
House Tour

Flash Tour of Island

Send Bahamas Greeting Card

Video Clip of Bahamas Beaches

Flash Tour of Harbour Island

Harbour Island Beach
House Tour

Flash Tour of Island

Send Bahamas Greeting Card


PREACHER'S CAVE


Preacher's Cave, on the North end of the island, has both a natural and historical appeal. It was in this large, blue-shadowed cave that the Eleutheran Adventurers sought shelter after shipwrecking nearby. They had fled Bermuda in search of religious freedom, and it was in this cave that they held their first services in what would become their permanent home.

In 1647 a group that called themselves the "Eleutherian Adventurers" left Bermuda to find a place where they could practice religious freedom. They encountered a storm and the ship they were sailing in ran onto rocks which was later called the Devils Back Bone north of Spanish Wells.

The Adventurers lead by William Sayles found their way to shore and took refuge in what was later called Preacher's Cave. A religious service was held in Preacher's cave every year for the next 100 years on the anniversary of the day that God lead the adventurers to safety in what they believed to be the promised land.

Although they had shelter they had lost all their provisions and were unable to feed themselves. One of their members an expert sailor took a small boat and managed to make his way to boston, where he told of their plight and asked for help. The citizens of Boston sent all the supplies they needed. The Adventurers were able to start their new life in the place they christened Eleuthera from the Greek word meaning Freedom.

The Eleutherian people later repaid Boston by cutting the extremely valuable Braziletto wood and sent shiploads to Boston with the instructions to sell it and donate the proceeds to Harvard University. Thereby repaying Boston for their kindness.

The newly settled island of Eleuthera was the first island to be settled in the Bahamas. Later black people came to Eleuthera also seeking freedom. They were welcomed by the adventures and they all lived happily side by side for centuries. They intermarried and most of the Eleutherians you meet today are descendants of the original freedom seekers that started it all. Today tourists come to Eleuthera and feel the same warmth, acceptance and feeling of freedom that has been experienced on Eleuthera for many hundred years, since the day it all started at Preacher's Cave.

Here's a few detailed maps of the north part of North Eleuthera, near Spanish Wells, that shows where Preacher's Cave is